The End of the World As We Know It! 💣 April 23, 1775 – New York City Wall Street, 1774 click image to enlarge Sunday, August 23, 1775, started out as any other Sunday in New York. The residents of the island were up early and off to their respective houses of worship for services. Families.. read more →

Stories I Don’t Tell!  The Indecent Side of Revolutionary Era New York City There are lots of stories I DON’T tell on the Revolutionary Era Tour! All of the tours are designed to be family friendly, so I stay away from things that aren’t suitable for children. But looking honestly at the time period, there’s.. read more →

The First Shot Will be Mortal 💣 Lexington and Concord The Shot Heard ‘Round The World April 19, 1775 Was there a way to avoid that fateful shot on Lexington Green? Is it possible that cooler heads might have prevailed? Let’s take a look at the debate going on in the British Parliament in early.. read more →

Famous for Being Famous! ♥ Peggy Shippen of Philadelphia Margaret, Peggy Shippen was born in 1760 in Philadelphia to a wealthy family that became politically divided during the Revolutionary War. (The town of “Shippensburg” was named for the Shippen family.) Her father, Edward Shippen, was a Loyalist leaning judge and member of the Pennsylvania Provincial.. read more →

We’re on the Same Side! Loyalist Treatment Under Military Occupation in NYC Tories and Loyalists A fascinating part of the American Revolution that we seldom hear about is the loyalist or tory experience. We grow up thinking they were the enemies of freedom. They were wealthy and corrupt supporters of the King scheming against the.. read more →

Farewell to the British!  Evacuation Day. Before President Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a national holiday, the most celebrated day of the year in New York City was Evacuation Day, November 25, 1783. The Long Occupation September 21, 1776 – British forces commanded by General William Howe took possession of New York City. Washington’s defeated army.. read more →

Bishop Samuel Provoost Portrait

On my tour today I had the honor of having descendants of the great Bishop Samuel Provoost. In 1775 he resigned his position at Trinity Church (The Church of England) due to his support for “the opposition”, the colonial rebellion. He moved upstate and in 1777 picked up arms to pursue the British after they.. read more →

“The Wandsworth Genealogical History of a Tory” from the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury, 4/16/1770. (Tory is the old term for Loyalist.) Found it while looking through newspapers for a different story.  Anti Church of England humor from the Whigs of NYC.  I can take a pretty good guess who the author(s) might be! The.. read more →

The Farmer Refuted, discount viagra published February 23, 1775 by James Rivington,  is Alexander Hamilton’s second response to a series of articles written under the pseudonym “A W Farmer” or, “A Westchester Farmer”. “A W Farmer” was, in reality, Samuel Seabury, an Anglican (Church of England) Rector who argued against the legality of a Continental.. read more →